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Laboratory of Molecular Neurogenetics

Our research

We are interested in how gene expression is regulated in the brain and how this process influences human brain evolution, neurodegenerative diseases, psychiatric disorders, and brain tumors. Our current focus is to study the role of epigenetic mechanisms and transposable elements. Our technical expertise includes CRISPR, reprogramming, bioinformatics, single-cell analysis, and human stem cells cultures.

Aims

  • To investigate the role of transposable elements in the human brain.

  • To dissect the contribution of transposable elements to human brain disorders.

  • To develop novel gene-editing tools.

Impact

With our research, we aim to discover new genetic mechanisms that influence how the human brain has evolved and now functions. We hope that our work will impact our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, psychiatric disorders, and brain tumors and in the long run lead to new treatments of these devastating disorders.

How our research contributes to the goals of MultiPark

 We aim to identify new genetic mechanisms that contribute to the origin and pathology of neurodegenerative disorders. Our research addresses the aims of MultiPark's working groups 1 and 3. 


Research Team & Publications

Read about publications and research team members of Molecular Neurogenetics in the LU Research Portal.

Outreach

Read the article about how the activation of ancient viruses during brain development causes inflammation.

Read the article about the darker parts of our genetic heritage.https://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/article/study-sheds-light-darker-parts-our-genetic-heritage.

Read at Health Canal about the darker parts of our genetic heritage.

Read the article about the new gene technique inspired by bacteria´s immune defence.

 

Profile photo of Johan Jakobsson.
Photo: Kenneth Rouna

Johan Jakobsson

Professor

johan [dot] jakobsson [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

Link to Johan Jakobsson's profile in the LU Research Portal

Twitter: @JakobssonLab

Homepage: https://www.molecular-neurogenetics.lu.se